I fell in love with Rachel True after I saw her play Rochelle in The Craft. Rochelle was the lone Black girl in a white girl witch squad and I could not relate more — with the tokenism, not the witch squad. I was thirteen and begged my mom to take my best friends and me to the movie theater to see it. This was way back in 1996 when all Black tv shows broadcasted on the same night of the week. Unlike the tokens before her that never acknowledged their Blackness (hello, Lisa Turtle and Angela Moore), Rochelle’s unambiguity…


From baking to bedding, the Brooklyn-based visionary is claiming space in home and lifestyle…

image: photo of Danielle Moore in a bathtub that’s filled with African-print pillows. Photo courtesy of instagram.com/bkchefdanielle

When I met Danielle Moore in 2010, she was a popular Brooklyn-based baker, known for baking cakes and pastries. Before shows like Cupcake Wars and Nailed It was trending, Danielle was known as the go-to baker for mouthwatering works of art. Eventually, she would expand Annie Mae’s Cheesecakes into a full food service company, offering catering, dinner parties, and cooking tutorials. Raised in Brooklyn by a mother and grandmother who loved to cook, entertain, and serve as matriarchs to their community. …


Solange’s last album. Patti’s Pies. Self-care. That’s a short list of life’s joys that are misunderstood…

image: Audre Lorde, wearing black glasses, a tight afro, and a button down coat. Beside her is one of her famous quotes, ‘Caring for myself is not a self-indulgence, it is self-preservation and that is an act of political warfare.’

Most people see me as a high vibing, ‘the glass is half full’ kind of girl. I’ll admit, as a self-employed writer who often travels, my life is pretty charming. I spend my days doing what I love when I feel like doing it. However, it wasn’t always this way. Before life was charming, it was violent and unpredictable. I spent the better part of the last decade battling domestic violence, poverty, and substance abuse. …


They startin’ real early, y’all…

I was hoping to stride into 2020 leaving (at least a little) misogynoir behind us. Of course, America’s not having that. Not to suggest that Black women should never be a target — I mean, we are human. But, damn, why we always gotta be the only target? We’re only thirty two days into the new year, yet it’s been jam-packed with misogynoir-fueled offenses. Below are seven moments in January that proved that, it doesn’t matter how rich, how accomplished, or how young, no Black woman or girl will be spared…

7. First, they came for Blue

Shortly after new year’s…


The Amazing, The Aight, and the Rest of ‘em…

When I decided to promote Black literature as a form of activism back in 2018 I was working with a very linear approach. I felt it was vital for me to catch up to all the Black classics I missed out while reading snoozes like The Catcher and the Rye, smh. My collection of reads in 2018 reflected that mission, with an equal mix of classics and new releases. This year, I wanted to make sure I was keeping an ear to these literary streets so I could promote new releases…


Black women aren’t new to this, we are the root of it!

Black women aren’t new to this, we are the root of it!

Listen… non-Black women have remixed intersectionality like Jazzy Jeff at a Juneteenth cookout. Without effort or consideration, they take the analytical framework that Black women have carved out with blood and Black flesh and use it to overtake Black women-led spaces. Here’s a few facts about intersectionality — the concept, and the term…

4. Just because conservatives turned ‘identity politics’ into a bad word doesn’t mean it is.

In 1974, the Black feminist organization, Combahee River Collective released a statement that would set the pace for a new era in the…


When non-Black women decided that they would go from antagonizer to ally in the name of ‘helping’ Black womxn, we should have known better…

image: Google search image of the Oxford definition of the word ‘ally’. The noun definition; a state cooperating with another for a military of other purpose. The verb definition; combine or unite a resource or commodity with (anther) for mutual benefit. e.g. “he allied his racing expeirnience with his father’s business acumen.

It seemed like a good idea at the time. Non-Black women declaring that they would take their privilege and whip it into lean, mean, white supremacist dismantling machines. I know I’m not the only one who giggled as they clamored over each other to be the favorite of any given anti-racist influencer, activist, or artist. They couldn’t join enough anti-racism groups and organizations. They began to introduce themselves as ‘recovering’ racists (ha!) on a mission to…


bell hooks, Octavia Butler, and Angela Davis are among the greats sitting on my bookshelf, aching to be read. The thing is, no book needs amplification like newly released Black books. Last May’s Book of the Month, They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South gave historian and writer Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers modest traction. Each month, dozens of outstanding Black reads hits book stores, Amazon, and Kindle, but, nobody knows. This is why I spend hours searching for new releases so I can recommend (the good ones), promote, and create traction. Bottom line, I’mma try…


And, it doesn’t require me to log on or go off…

DISCLAIMER: This is my personal journey through navigating activism and social justice culture. While I strongly advise every Black person who’s involved with activism to begin alternative practices that are not as emotionally and physically strenuous, this advice is null and void to non-Black folks. Y’all should be using your privilege, your picket signs, your voices, and your white dominance to bring about change. All day. Every day.

Me, giving a lecture on intersectionality to college students at SUNY Old Westbury.

For the past decade, the bulk of my written work has been dedicated to the causes and issues that affected me…


Writer and historian, Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers prove that vvhite women had a lot more to do with American slavery than most people realize…

There’s an image of the American white woman; she’s smart enough to breed and vote, but, too docile to lead and too fragile to harm. When it comes to American slavery, it’s simply assumed that white women were too oppressed, too busy managing their homes to be involved in the peculiar institution of slavery. From history books to political pundits, long and gone white men are solely held responsible for centuries of kidnapping, rape, and torture enslaved…

Tamela J. Gordon

Writer. Feminist. Advocate for people living with HIV/AIDS.

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